LynnEsther

Archive for the ‘Street Branding’ Category

The Subtleties of Logic

In Street Branding on July 29, 2008 at 11:53 pm
SubtleTea Storefront

SubtleTea Storefront

The integration of both visual and verbal identities seen in logos and names of brands has given such businesses timeless relationships with its customers. I came across SubtleTea, a small tea house along Madison Avenue between 30th and 31st street. SubtleTea is a cozy place where you can enjoy the unique tea blends and pastries while flipping through a good read.

I wanted to talk about the visual and verbal identities of SubtleTea. There are several elements that are working together to bring this brand together in its corporate identity. The first you notice is the name, subtletea, which consists of the two words, subtle and tea. Putting together the two words, subtletea, creates a remarkable

SubtleTea Logo

SubtleTea Logo

Wide selection of magazines at SubtleTea

nomenclature for the store brand as two real word, descriptive names come together to create a composite name. A closer look at the logo gives you an idea how the name and logo work together as you notice the logo being a ring from the bottom of a tea cup. Indeed it is a subtle visual element (tea cup ring) that complements the nomenclature of the brand name (subtle and tea). I thought it was a clever way to mesh the two verbal and visual elements together to create an overall corporate identity that appeals to its target consumer.

Cozy ambiance

Cozy ambiance

subtleteas storefront gives a natural and organic feel as the tanned exterior and brown awning complement the natural selection of teas. It’s a very delightful place to sit back with a casual conversation between friends or study while enjoying the cozy ambiance.

The Luxury of Wearing Your Car

In Street Branding on July 28, 2008 at 5:09 pm

Louis Vuitton Monogrammed Car

The Korean consumer is very brand conscious in almost every accessory. Sometimes it can get a little too wild and overwhelming. I walked through a popular shopping street in Seoul, Korea, called “Rodeo Drive,” yes, like the one in Beverly Hills, and I saw a Smart Car-like vehicle dressed in the Louis Vuitton monogram. A very bold accessory to have the luxury of dressing your car in such a brand- I thought it was hilarious and very interesting. I don’t think LV advertises on cars in this manner, so I’m assuming that the driver of this fashionable vehicle just decided to wear the handbag on the car rather than herself. A very bold statement of love and passion for LV.

The LV gives this little car a fun personality- perhaps it’s striving to live that luxurious life. Whether you think it’s just obnoxious or actually cute- the driver definitely has got some character. Her name is Sharon. I imagine her to be a petite women in her mid-twenties. She’s got an overly accesorized cell phone chain with a pink piglet hanging from it. Her ringtone is very catchy, and is probably the hit song of a popular female group/diva (Equivalent to those of Miley Cyrus). She’s working hard to maintain a good walk on her 4-inch stilettos flashing her cotton candy pedicure. Although she is flashy in her accessories, she knows how to live a practical lifestyle while being brand conscious. She enjoys driving a unique car, especially because hers is small and easy to drive around the narrow side streets of Seoul. She buys her clothes and accessories from stores in Korea that are the equivalent of Aldo, UNIQLO, Pink and BeBe. She graduated from EWHA Women’s University, which is the Wellesley University of Korea. Sharon’s got passion to start her own clothing line, and is planning to go to graduate school for an Associate’s degree in Fashion Design at Hongik University, which is similar to Parsons in New York. Sharon is definitely making known her character in her flashy ride.

Practical Parisia: Smart Cars and Checkered Crosswalks

In Street Branding on July 26, 2008 at 8:13 pm
No Parking Zone

No Parking Zone

The organization of lines and patterns in a given space is probably one of the most insightful memories of my trip to Paris. The organization of these two elements differ from culture to culture. I learned that the way a culture presents itself by simply being transparent to all its respective values and beliefs is what becomes an integral foundation for the brand soul.

Checkered Crosswalks

Checkered Crosswalks

I learned that Paris cares about its people. The use of shorter pedestrian streetlight posts and patterned crosswalks are some examples of making Paris a people-friendly city. Using checkered crosswalks is visually recognizable from a distance. And having relatively low pedestrian streetlight posts on either end of crosswalks is a way to communicate that pedestrians should always come first. This makes Paris a walkable city by having people feel safe and comfortable. Another fact is that the effective use of Smart Cars and old Mini Coopers between slim Parisian roads is probably one of the most practical innovations. This European trend of driving small has shown other countries how to live a practical lifestyle. Some Korean automotive brands such as Hyundai and Daewoo have manufactured Atoz and Matiz, respectively, to accommodate the narrow crowded roads and side-streets of Korea.

Smart Car

Smart Car

Nike Paris

Advertisements are organized in a clean and respectful manner. There are many print ads displayed throughout subway stations, lamp posts and store windows. All these print ads are framed and mounted in their respective areas- I don’t think I’ve seen a single wall of pasted posters/ads. Overall, there wasn’t much clutter between the city streets.

Obama Ad

Obama Ad

21 Movie Poster

21 Movie Poster

Corona

Corona

Welcoming into Sewage

In Street Branding on July 26, 2008 at 7:11 pm
Gutter of Giverny

Gutter of Giverny

Paris is a beautiful city, but I thought I’d trek out to the outskirts of the city to learn about something new- something I won’t be able to learn from a tour guide or a textbook. I paid a visit to Claude Monet’s country home in the town of Giverny. Yes, I saw the famous bridge with the lily pads where Monet painted his emotions through every delicate brush stroke. But the most interesting part of the trip was the intricacies of this small town.

Many walked past it, but I stopped to think how unique this gutter was. How silly, I took a picture of this gutter because it was different. It seemed to understand the properties of water- the physical flow of ripples and currents. The smooth, wavy use of lines caught my attention, and I realized how this design composition of a simple and widely neglected public property, a gutter, was welcoming water into sewage. Maybe the pink flower petals made me draw such positive insight, but I just thought it was interesting how a simple element of design can change one’s perception.

Scaffoldings Stand Taller than The Eiffel

In Street Branding on July 26, 2008 at 5:38 pm
Construction of Storefront

Construction of Storefront

The city of Paris makes effective use of space, avoiding clutter and disorganization when placing outdoor ads. The use of such construction sites is an effective way to draw attention to consumers as they shop their way from store to store. Construction sites where scaffoldings are placed are usually areas people tend to avoid, but by displaying outdoor visual and verbal messaging consumers develop an early relationship with the store brand. Perhaps it may be similar to looking at ultrasound snapshots of your new baby in its early fetal stages- you begin developing a relationship before your baby is even born. In the same way, as construction sites begin to reveal to consumers the early stages of what is being developed and built through a simple billboard display, consumers will anticipate for what is to come from the initial brand touchpoint.

Construction site wrapped with a massive canvas outdoor advertisement

Construction site wrapped with a massive canvas outdoor advertisement

Storefront in Construction

Construction of Storefront